Entering a new market isn’t simply about renting offices in a different country. The world might be globalized, but there are still huge differences between consumers across the globe. Before moving your business to the next level, be sure to take a moment to consider the most crucial aspects.

New Market Research Is a Must

It might sound like a cliché, but it is a fact. Enter a new market before learning as much as you can about it and your grand entrance will likely result in terrible marketing faux pas. Do your research and you’ll be surprised:

Translated Website? Bummer.

Hiring a mediocre do-it-all translating agency might sound tempting. After all, it’s just linguistics, right? Wrong. There are nuances between languages that go far beyond mere translation. What you want to do is to transcreate. What does that mean? Simply put, create a new language version of your original website that has the same effect on its visitor as the original one. Still unconvinced?

  • In Poland, trust but verify. What might seem to mean basic (ordinary) actually means offensive (ordinarny). These words are so-called fake friends and Polish is rich in them.
  • Be careful when it comes to idiomatic expressions. After all, the “@” symbol has three different animal names in European languages

Learn From the Best (And Worst)

The era of globalization and internet comes brings many advantages. And no, this time we don’t mean food delivery. We mean that these days everybody’s failures and successes are free to be inspired by. All the biggest companies have their data out there, you just need to go and pick it. And the best thing is, you don’t even have to do that. We’ve already done that for you:

And there’s much more, feel free to look below. Or if you prefer, check what GFluence can do for you to start creating a story of your own!

Can’t Just Buy Your Way In – What Groupon Learned in China

Can’t Just Buy Your Way In – What Groupon Learned in China

Everyone likes a good deal, right? Nothing can compare to the when you buy a desired item with a 20% or more discount.If you are a company that helps people find the best deals available, it shouldn’t be a problem to attract users. This is how things looked on paper when Groupon decided to enter China, one of the up and coming and top ecommerce markets, in 2011.

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Best Buy said Bye to the UK. Why?

Best Buy said Bye to the UK. Why?

In our previous post we have discussed the fact that it can be sometimes challenging for Western companies to grasp Chinese cultural differences. These challenges are, however, not exclusive to China and can often arise even when you expand to a seemingly less mysterious country. This will be obvious after analyzing a story of an American electronics mega-store Best Buy and its failed attempt to enter the UK market.

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Coming to Asia: Wal-Mart’s Blunders in Japan

Coming to Asia: Wal-Mart’s Blunders in Japan

Wal-Mart, the second largest retailer in the world, entered Japan in 2002. It used its common foreign strategy of creating a joint venture by purchasing large stakes in local retailers and taking control of ownership by gradually increasing the investment. However, its standard approach has backfired as WAL MART did not take into account the specifics of the Japanese retail market.

What went wrong?
1. Japanese buy in small quantities

Contrary to the Americans, Japanese tend to buy goods in small quantities as they are not used to make weekly supplies. This trend can be partly explained by the high cost of real estate. […] Read more